Drones: The challenges of UAV regulation in Bayside and beyond (PII)

by Ed Kennedy

This is part II of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) article, following on from my conversation with Nicolas Pette, owner and operator of drone company Drone Under last week. Part I here: http://www.baysidecitizen.com/?p=483

As it stands the wider industry has presided over some considerable growth in a number of areas in recent months, and particularly as it relates to real estate, the environment and recreational use – all areas that may have a notable impact on the way Baysiders live, work and play. This is because the use of UAV has revolutionized -for the better – the way real estate agents are able to show off high-rise apartments, farmers ability to observe crops and land, and amongst recreational uses, provided a whole new way to film daily adventures. By contrast, the challenges surrounding the use and regulation of drones remains considerable.

One of the chief concerns going forward shall be the safe use of drones – especially by recreational users- and especially as applies to circumstances surrounding emergencies. Numerous incidents have been reported in recent months surrounding drone users letting their devices take flight while a police, fire, or ambulance emergency is underway. While CASA has issued

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Over our heads? Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and the issues surrounding free flight

by Ed Kennedy

Drones are a big business right now. Since their emergence on the market in recent years, Drones a.k.a Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), have been taken up and adopted for use by an array of Baysiders.

To many, these machines are used for recreational tools, and often seen in compliment to the ‘mini action cameras’ – such as Go Pro – that allow people to film their often high-octane adventures.

By contrast, for an increasing number of filmmakers, documentarians and entrepreneurs, these aerial cameras represent a new frontier when it comes to building a brand and business.

Yet, there is also a downside to the rise of the availability of these drones with security, privacy and even logistical concern – due to the sheer amount of new UAVs in the sky posing a potential problem to those on the ground.

With it understood the Civil Aviation Administration Authority (CASA) is set to re-examine the laws surrounding drone flight in Australia – currently viewed by critics as minimal and insufficient –an examination of this new and oftentimes not yet fully understood area of aviation is worthwhile.

Nicolas Pette, is one such example of a local who ‘taken to the

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